ATL by Night Artist Spolight: ATHRS

This article is by our new writer, Luminous. Enjoy!

Punk Rock electronic artist, ATHRS, born Mike Torres, performed for his second time at Imagine Music Festival (IMF), this year in Hampton, Georgia. The Orlando, FL, native often performs in the Southeast and said Atlanta’s premier electronic music festival is one of his favorites. “I love performing in Atlanta, this is my second year at Imagine. Glen and Maddie (of IRIS Presents) throw one of the best festivals out here and it’s always so amazing to be a part of it,” he said.

Rock and EDM have been in an increasingly intertwined relationship ever since Skrillex burst onto the DJ circuit after leaving his post-hardcore band “From First to Last.” Steve Aoki was a singer and guitarist in the scream band “This Machine Kills,” EDM powerhouse, Zedd, was once a member of death core band Dioramic, and bass legend, Bassnectar, also was once in a metal band. Some acts leave the “rock sound” almost entirely, trading guitars for synthesizers and hard bass, at times only referencing their roots in mashups or remixes.

ATHRS has managed to evolve into EDM while keeping his pop punk influences intact. This has allowed him to create original music that melds the two genres in a genuine way. ATHRS played for an intimate show for a crowd at the Six Feathers stage, splitting the set between his laptop and DJ Controller, and grabbing his guitar to leave behind the booth and rock out on stage and right in front of his audience.

Growing up on pop and punk music, ATHRS says he is influenced by bands like All Time Low, Green Day, and blink-182. He also has a penchant for DJs like Kayzo and Borgore, and says Adventure Club, who played IMF this year, is one of his biggest influences: “I was super hyped to see them! They killed it; it was an ABSOLUTELY epic show!” The pioneers of vocal dubstep put on an epic show full of lights, lasers, and their signature sound, famous for attracting many fest-goers into the electronic scene in the first place.

 

ATHRS thinks the diversity of sound within EDM music has attracted more and more people to American EDM music and events. He uses his platform to produce a unique combo he calls “pop-punk electronic” with vocals characteristic of punk rock, interwoven with synths, energetic beats and high energy drops. His songs vary from highly rock influenced to more house influences like his single, “Shed My Skin.” During his performance of “Under My Skin,” a cut from his upcoming EP, ATHRS croons about not letting the world get to him before a crescendo of heavy, melodic guitar riffs, with a dance beat picking up to join the melange of sound

“People are hungry for real talent, drive and ambition, and that’s what I hope to bring them. They also get to see [my] vulnerability. I think it really comes through in the music,” he said. ATHRS’ fans, at Imagine or people who want to hear his unique brand of punk EDM, can catch him next at Uncle Lou’s entertainment hall in Orlando, FL, on October 14th.

ATHRS’ latest EP “Pop Punk is Dead” will be releasing soon and a music video for his single, “Rollercoaster” was recently released on Youtube. Fans can find more of ATHRS’ music on Soundcloud, and Spotify.

 

Review: Tritonal and Gorgon City at Opera Nightclub

Tritonal stopped into Atlanta on Friday, August 3, to play a set at Opera Nightclub in Midtown. The American music duo from Austin, TX, played to a packed audience with a mix of house, trance and popular mixes from other DJs (Everyone enjoyed that Chris Lake mix, am I right?). Despite the guy who I caught surfing Reddit, everyone was having a great time.

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I walked all around that main floor. People were standing everywhere and it was crazy upfront near the end of the night. I saw shirtless guys in every direction! It was a mixture of “Ooooh!” and “Ewwww!” for half an hour.

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The next evening featured Gorgon City, an English EDM production duo from North London. Kye “Foamo” Gibbon and Matt “RackNRuin” Robinson-Scott played their house music set to a bunch of stoked ATL fans–enough to make it another packed, hot and sweaty night in Midtown.

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Thomas Demey, 27, of Atlanta, attended Saturday night’s event.  “‘Grooves On The Vinyl.’ This song brought me back to Gorgon City after the ‘Sirens’ album. They nearly disappeared off the house map but came back strong with this tech-house banger. I’m in this tech-house groove right now with melodies and lyrics–this hits the spot.”

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Demey had the pleasure of viewing Gorgon City from the VIP section. “VIP at Opera is always an interesting experience. The people up there are typically not there for the music being played but rather the VIP experience. That’s my not crowd. I’d much rather get down with the dancing crowd. People trying to get sweaty (by dancing) and into the music. Ultimately, I spent more time in VIP for this show but I do prefer the main floor.” He added, “The only downside is that Opera was exceptionally packed for both this weekend’s shows, so that made spending time on the floor difficult–especially if you wanted room to dance.”

 

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Space was a premium on both nights, so word to the wise: Go VIP if you like a lot of area around you and want to see these bigger acts. The main floor is not for claustrophobic!

Keep dancing, Atlanta!

 

ATL by Day Imagine Festival Oceania

Inside the 2018 Imagine Music Festival Lineup – Disco Inferno Stage

It’s time for part 3 of our coverage of Imagine’s lineup!

Check out the other posts here, for Oceania stage and here for Amazonia stage! This article is for Imagine’s third stage – Disco Inferno. This stage will have some absolutely killer talent that are worth the listen. We’ve grouped the artists in Imagine’s order:

Disco Inferno Stage

Green Velvet

Green Velvet, aka Curtis Jones, has been in the game for as long as I can remember. He was on the forefront of the electro-punk sound and now has turned his attention to the more mainstream House tastes. The vocals you’ll hear on these tracks are inspired by the likes of Prince (RIP) and Gary Numan – and with good effect! Here’s an example of the old vs the new with the well known track “La La Land”.

 

Oliver Heldens

Oliver Heldens is a favorite of mine. Like most people I’d say I discovered him with the release of his song “Gecko” (and the vocal edit “Overdrive”). The Heldeep radio podcast has also been phenomenal for years. If you want to know what kind of music an artist will play at their sets, their radio is a great place to check since it’s basically just their tastes. He also has some killer collabs like “You Know” with Zeds Dead.

 

Boogie T

Boogie T rolls with a sound that combines deep bass dubstep and reggae (mostly). He’s best known for his collabs with Ganja White Night, like “Flava”. You’ll find his solo work like “2KFO” to be much heavier, and (in my opinion) a better sound for the festival atmosphere.

Squnto

Squnto brings it back to the heaviest days of dubstep, and I’m not complaining! His dub chopping skills are palpable, and he even has some sweet videos showing off how he does his work.

Chocolate Puma

Chocolate Puma are two fellas out of the Netherlands who just want to get you bouncin. Collabs with groups like the Bingo Players have been great, and their solo stuff is no different. Here are two songs from opposite sides of their sound.

EDX

No, this won’t be an online learning seminar blast over loud speakers. EDX the musician is a specialist in summer house, but his talents go all over the house genre. Pay him a visit for some much needed summer vibes.

Joker

Joker had some big hitting tracks back in the late 2000’s dubstep game, and I hope he brings that sound to Imagine. Take a listen and flash back 10 years to the rise of dubstep. His newer sound ranges from mellow dubstep to spacey.

Koan Sound

Koan Sound is funky dubstep, think Griz without the sax/vocals. I’m a big fan of the sound personally, and I’m excited to see how it plays out on the big stage.

Latmun

Latmun is a newer name, with a sound of what he calls “Tech House”. Excited to see more from him, with his unique tunes I’m sure it’ll be interesting.

 

Noisia

Noisia is a crew that I’ve followed for some time. Like some other artists on this stage, they’ve been in the game since before dubstep (and DnB) hit it big, and I’d say they’re one of the reasons it did. I expect this show to be absolutely wild.

Shlump

Shlump, besides being a fun name to say, knows his way around some wobble. Trap is the name of the game, but the sound has some solid wobble to it that give his songs a fuller, more rounded sound.

 

Tiga

Tiga is definitely a different kind of electronic, even blurring the lines between electronic and electro. As a general fan of these old funky tunes, I’d say more power to him! You’ve probably heard the track “Bugatti” before. His other tracks have the same sound minus the catchy vocal hook.

Walker & Royce

Keeping the theme of 80’s style electro-house, and I’m just digging it. Especially in this day and age with Toto’s “Africa” being one of the top played songs on Spotify, I say bring back electro.

 

Wax Motif

Wax Motif actually reminds me a lot of Oliver Heldens mixed with Shiba San. Big punchy bass, a solid beat, and an overall groove you can get lost to.

ATL by Day Imagine Festival Oceania

Inside the 2018 Imagine Music Festival Lineup – Amazonia Stage

It’s time for part 2 of our coverage of Imagine’s lineup! We’ll be staggering our lineup posts each week to make sure you don’t exceed your mobile data costs, and to keep up the hype!

Check out the first post here, for Oceania stage! This article is for Imagine’s second main stage – Amazonia. Second stage or not, Amazonia has some killer artists you’ll have to check out. We’ve grouped the artists in Imagine’s order:

Amazonia Stage

Griz

I have made a point to see Griz every single time he’s in town. See him, and you will too. This is a psychadelic trip through dubstep brought to you by a skinny white dude on a saxophone playing like he has something to prove. By the end of the show, you’ll be feeling as happy as I expect Griz does every damn day.

Zhu

Zhu was always sort of an enigma to me. Is it EDM? Sure. Is it pop? Eh. Does it belong on the radio? I have no clue. But it’s there and here we are. I don’t really expect Zhu to throw down, but you’ll get some shoulder swings in if you catch a groove or two.

Cashmere Cat

Cashmere Cat! Love this guy. One of the most talented producers, whether his name is on the track or not. He’s funky, fresh, and one of the best. He produced one of the best sleeper pop songs of the past 5 years, Ryn Weaver’s Octahate. I’ve included his remix below.

Jai Wolf

Jai Wolf makes music that would be perfect for the scene in a movie where the girl and guy run away together in the end and live happily ever after. Just happy tunes, who can complain?

Shpongle (Simon Posford DJ Set)

I mean, how can you go wrong with a name like Shpongle? But for real, you’re not going to find many Shpongle “songs” out there. That’s because Shpongle is basically like the EDM version of a jam band – and that’s awesome. Totally unique and trippy as hell.

Ekali

Ekali will keep the mellow and chill trap running for you. Keep in mind it’ll be heavier for the festival! This’ll be a great set for someone looking to hear some absolutely killer trap and catch a break from the wild stuff.

Eoto

I’m not as familiar with Eoto, but looks to me he’s working the classic instrumentals and synth combo. I really can’t complain there – it’s a great combo! To me the music could be the love child of some Gramatik and Pretty Lights, enough funk to go around, interlaced vocal backtracks, and instrumentals layered over synth like they were there all along.

Lotus

Keeping the instrumental funk going, we’ve got another jam band up in Amazonia. Lotus is more reminiscent of Phish for me: full band, lengthy heavy jams, and some breaks for instrumental solos spread around. These guys will keep you on your toes in a way you won’t normally get at an EDM festival.

Levitation Jones

It’s like DJ Snake blasted off to Mars! Levitation Jones runs some of the spacey trap and has a tremendously unique sound. This set is bound to be nothing short of trippy and spacey. Jones won’t be the only one levitating.

Protohype

We’re back to the big room with Protohype. Protohype has some absolutely killer tracks, and I fully expect a killer classic EDM and dubstep set from them. I expect to hear some of their heavier tunes, like Blackout below.

Yheti

Man, what a wild sound. Yheti is like nothing I’ve heard before honestly, and imagining these tracks with some heavy bass that only a festival can provide is getting me hyped up. Expect some funky, fresh, and spacey trap.

Toadface

Toadface can be seen on tracks with Yheti and the like and these tracks are always a bit less trap, more progressive, and in my opinion a bit funkier. Hey I’m not complaining, I think it’s a great sound and I’m pumped to catch this set and see what Toadface can do. Yheti and Toadface hit a back to back set in EDC this year so be ready for double the bang.

Ployd

The first video I found of Ployd was a tight set at Atlanta’s own Terminal West, so I know he’s a homeboy. Show him some ATL love at Imagine this year.

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Shaky Beats Survival Guide: Part Four

It’s Wednesday so we’re now only 2 days away from Shaky Beats! It’s time to start picking outfits and getting that show schedule planned out. Today’s article is going to focus on getting yourself food and drink. Welcome to Part Four of your Shaky Survival Guide! See Part One here, Two here, and Three here.

Getting Eats

Music festivals these days have taken to food trucks rather than food stands for the most part. I, for one, am all about this life. Food trucks have way better quality than the basic burgers served at festival food stands, and they’re typically much more reasonably priced. The variety is greater, and the competition between trucks means that they can’t charge 15 dollars for a taco.
There will still be some food stands around in most festivals. These are typically overpriced and crappier than the food trucks. Just go to the food trucks.
One perk of having a festival in the heart of Atlanta is the wide selection of restaurants nearby. If you get tired of the food trucks in the festival and you aren’t in a rush to get to the next show, we recommend you walk to one of the many nearby restaurants to get a bite!

Getting Drank

For water, you’re going to want to use your Camelbak or a large water bottle. There are quick refill stations so you can fill up once or twice a day and be solidly hydrated. If it’s a hot day, I’d recommend refilling every time you change stages.
For drinks, get em as often as you’re comfortable with. I’m not talking about what you’re comfortable with taking in, I’m talking about what you’re comfortable with coming out. If you’re not a fancy VIP person, you’re going to have to plan your bathroom trips carefully.
A well-hydrated person is probably going to need to hit the bathrooms every 2 beers. Keep in mind that beers are tall boys at these festivals. And guess what? You have two hands! That’s right, double fisting is the way to go. I’d say every time you switch stages make a bathroom trip, grab two beers, and nurse those until you switch. Then wash, rinse, and repeat.
Beer vs Wine vs Liquor. I’d normally say to go with your preference, but honestly there are some right and wrong choices here. I really cannot recommend wine at a music festival. I guess some people like wine on a warm day, I just can’t understand it. For liquor, don’t do shots. You’re going to get dehydrated and hate life. I also dislike mixed drinks for festivals because you get a ton of ice and it’s more expensive. Your best bets are drinks you can nurse, like beer.

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s article, where we’ll have some final thoughts for your Shaky experience and some spotlights on our favorite lesser known artists!

Shaky Beats Survival Guide: Part Three

Only three more days until Shaky Beats! Part 3 of your survival guide here, and I’m going to discuss some basics about actually getting around within the festival. Welcome to Part three of your Shaky Survival Guide! See Part One here and Part Two here.

Fitting In

When you first get in line as a new festival-goer, you’ll probably either think:

“Wow everyone here is dressed in neon suspenders and mesh hoodies and I’m here in a polo and J-Crew shorts”

Or

“Oh no, everyone here is dressed like a Banana Republic model and I’m here in a full-scale dragon costume with functioning wings”.

Honestly, everyone that’s been new to festival life has had these thoughts, especially people that don’t roll in 10 deep with their crew. If you’re rolling in with 10 of your best friends, congrats! If you’re not, just take a deep breath and calm down. My tip to get over the anxiety of fitting in at a music festival, especially EDM festivals is to just talk to the person closest to you. These are the friendliest people in the world, and anybody in line next to you is going to be happy just to know you. Nobody there is judging you and the more you socialize the more you’ll come to realize that everyone at Shaky Beats is there for the same reasons – to listen to some great music.

On the same note, there are some general codes of conduct to follow. It can be tempting to judge others for their outfits, actions, or behavior. Just keep it to yourself and focus on enjoying the show, because everyone else is just trying to enjoy the show in their own ways.

Finding Your Friends

So you’ve made it to the festival and you can hear your favorite artist off in the distance! Your friends are messaging you to come meet up, so you start walking into the swarm of colorful outfits and BAM you’re lost as all hell. Yeah Central Park isn’t the biggest venue, but the festival can be a daunting place. How are you going to find your friends?

  1. Use your landmarks. The stages are great landmarks of course, but you have to think smaller if you want people to be able to find you when you’re trying to meet up at a show. The sound booth is a quality landmark, drink stations, food stations, etc. will all work better than the vague “I’m at stage X”.
  2. Use totems! Your best landmark when you’re actually in the crowd will be totems. Totems are those tall poles with funny or neat pictures on them, lights, foam animals, whatever. They rise above the crowd so texting a friend “I’m standing under Spongebob” or “I’m between Oprah and the Rainbow Cat meme” will work great for finding one another. These are especially useful when you’re not close to any larger landmarks like sound booths.
  3. Stand out in a crowd. Wear something fun, unique, or distinct. It doesn’t have to be a 15ft tall T-Rex costume, but wearing a wild hat or a neon shirt or something to make you a bit more distinct in a crowd will always help your friends find you.
  4. Have a fall-back plan. If your phones die, if you all get lost, if your friend gets way too wasted and can’t read a map, have an easy-to-spot location where you can meet up. For most festivals there are central pillars with schedules that will be there each day – these work great for meet ups because they are tall but have narrow bases. This makes them easy to spot from a distance, but ensure you can find each other easily once you arrive. Food stations are also good meetup spots so long as they’re there day after day.

Getting a Good Spot

Getting a prime location to view your favorite artist is important, but don’t think it’s the end of the world if you can’t be front row. It’s important to remember not shove your fellow concert-goers and to try to be mindful of those around you.

Standing up front is nice for seeing the show, but you’re going to have the force of a few hundred people up against you. If you like to dance in any way other than bouncing, enjoy breathing anything but freshly exhaled CO2, or like to have a bit of personal space I would not recommend this life. If you are bent on being up front, don’t push through from the back. Walk up the side, then cut through sideways. The best option is always to come to an earlier show and keep your spot.

For more visual shows and people that like to dance more, I’d recommend standing further back. Central Park has some hills you can take advantage of for seeing shows without being in the middle of the crowd.

Being a VIP

It’s an age-old question, but we still ask ourselves whenever we buy tickets – is VIP actually worth it?

My opinion is, probably not. For 90% of us your standard ticket will do just find and there is plenty of room to go around. Being closer to the stage is nice, sure, but what’s the point if there’s nobody to enjoy it with? In my opinion there are two people that VIP is suited for:

  1. Actual celebrities. If people are going to be stopping you and bothering you with requests for autographs, then sure. Go ahead and get yourself VIP so you can enjoy the show without being bothered.
  2. People with IBS. There is one understated perk of VIP access and that’s the ability to take craps in peace, with full AC. If you have IBS, then by all means you go ahead and get VIP because you need the access and comfort.

If you’re not on TV and don’t have a chronic bowel disease, then I think  you should just go ahead and get general admission and join the crowd.

That’s it for post #3, but stay posted for tomorrow’s post where I’ll be going over food and drink tips for the festival!

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Shaky Beats Survival Guide: Part Two

The Shaky Beats festival is coming to Central Park! Welcome to Part two of your Shaky Survival Guide! See Part One here!

Getting to the Festival

Please do yourself a favor. Don’t drive. It’s Atlanta, in Central Park (midtown, more or less ), just don’t. You’re going to hit some wild traffic there and back and your chance at parking will be abysmal. I would recommend taking MARTA or an Uber as close as you can get, and then walking a few blocks to the event. Basically, once your Uber is moving slower than the speed at which the people in the tie-dye shirts are walking, it’s time to bail and join them. This also lets your driver off the hook from sitting in traffic for twenty minutes trying to escape that mess. Then you’re off to the show!

Given the location of Shaky Beats this year, I’d highly recommend picking one of the area’s great restaurants as a pregame destination. Grab some lunch and brews and head on over to the festival once you’re good and ready. Some of my recommendations for pre-gaming are Midtown Tavern, Torched Hop, Two Urban Licks, and Venkman’s.

Planning Your Shows

There are roughly 100,000 apps for planning shows at music festivals, and Shaky Beats doesn’t disappoint! They have their own super handy app for booking your adventure. But for us lowly folk with little phone memory or that need their phones to stay alive throughout the whole day, I’d recommend a simple note-taking app like Google Keep.  I usually plan as follows:

  • For each time slot in the day, number your artist choices in order of how badly you want to see them.
  • For a time slot that has two great artists, you might have trouble deciding which one to see. Your best option in this case is just to suck it up and figure your life out. But one helpful deciding factor is the distance of the artist, or “how long is it going to take me to get to this show versus to the other one?” And “will I be able to get a decent spot? Which show will give me the best positioning for the next show after that?” 
  • Regardless of how badly you want to see your #1 show, always write down your #2 for each time slot. That way, if you’re meeting up with a crew or friends with differing opinions on who to see next, you can be open to two suggestions rather than one.
  • Critical info to know is 1) Artist 2) Time 3) Stage

If your phone fails, it’s always nice to have a backup. Typically you’ll be able to find flyers around the festival grounds with artist schedules, and there will be pillars dispersed with daily schedules and stage information. These are what I recommend for last-ditch items, or if you end up at a sweet show and just need to know who that artist was.

Dealing with Conflict

In some instances, you’ll disagree with your friends about what show to see next, and you’ll have to negotiate. Negotiation is an art form. Hell, our humble Commander in Chief even wrote a whole book about it. When it comes to negotiating with your crew between seeing your favorite artists and theirs, you’ll have to remember the 3 C’s of deal making: compromise, concession, and coercion. These go in order of your best-to-worst options.

  • Option 1- Compromise. This basically means you make a deal. They go see your favorite show now if you go and see theirs later. The trick? Their favorite show is also another one of your favorites. Pick a show that you know they will want to go to, and that you will like, but they don’t know you like. This will only work if you have not announced your festival show plans to your friends. You must keep these plans a secret to successfully come out on top of the compromise, otherwise you’ll come out even and that’s as bad as losing.
  • Option 2- Concession. This one means you’ll give them something. Buy them lunch, get them a t-shirt, some sort of knick-knack, whatever. The trick to winning this one? They give out tons of crap for free at these festivals. If you’re negotiating with someone, you might be able to split up for a while. Then you can sneak off and score some free swag or food and concede away.
  • Option 3- Coercion. This can be risky. This just means you get the rest of the group on your side and force the troublemaker to give in and see your show. The risk here is that if the group disagrees, then you become the troublemaker. The trick to coming out on top of this one is to ensure that the group (your backup) wants to see either your show, or the show coming on after your show at the same stage. This will give them reason to want to hang around and get a good spot.

Keep posted for three more parts to our Shaky Beats pre-event advice!

Music Festival Generic Picture

The Shaky Beats Survival Guide: Part One

The Shaky Knees and Shaky Beats festivals are coming to Central Park! For many Atlanta residents, these festivals are great opportunities to experience the music festival life without having to trek out to the middle of nowhere! As a chronic EDM festival-goer, I’ve picked up a few tricks that will help you get the most out of your festival experience. Welcome to your Shaky Survival Guide!

What to Wear

Guys – I don’t care if you wear pants or shorts. I don’t care if you wear a polo or a t-shirt. I don’t care if you wear a silly costume.  But if you care about fitting in while staying cool and comfortable, shorts and a tank top is a safe option. But dear, sweet baby Jesus, wear compression shorts. You’re going to be dancing, walking, etc. for what adds up to a few miles every day, for up to 3 days. Things will chafe.

Ladies – For both Shaky Knees and Shaky Beats, you can’t go wrong with high-waisted jean shorts and a bohemian cropped tank top. Self conscious? Make it a full tank. Voila, you’re now dressed like 90% of girls at music festivals.

However,  you’ll also see some guys and ladies wearing much more elaborate attire that may or may not include wings, rainbows, and a variety of colored makeup and sprays. You’ll also see other people wearing much less, to say the least. Just remember that no matter how you dress at a music festival, do it for yourself! Much of what makes the music festival a fun and magical environment is the ability to be yourself and let your freak flag fly, so don’t hold back! Live your truth.  In a lot of ways, the modern definition of the music festival is owed to the men and women who dare to be authentic, bold and colorful. 

Essential Packing List

A music festival is a lot like a crappy Australia – everything there is trying to kill you, but really really slowly. Your packing essentials are going to make sure you survive the day each day.

Essential 1: a Camelbak or similar water pouch backpack. You gotta hydrate, mate. Most music festivals these days have special hydration stations with spouts intended for these packs. Getting one provides you with a lot of advantages. No more paying for water bottles, fewer refill trips, plus a backpack! If it doesn’t go with your outfit (ladies this is probably the case) just make sure you have a friend with one that doesn’t mind cooties. Remember to rinse and empty before you bring it!

Essential 2: Earplugs. You can get ’em fancy or you can get the foam classics, but get earplugs. You might say, “But, but, I go to a music festival to hear the music! Why would I put in plugs that make it harder for me to hear it???” That’s because when you listen to music on your phone, you get a warning at 85dB. When you listen to music at a festival, that beat is bumping at a steady 130dB all day long (keep in mind this is a logarithmic scale folks). You’ll hear the music just fine through those earplugs, but while you’re enjoying the show, they’re doing the important job of ensuring you don’t go deaf. You can even go fancy and get specialty buds that block only harmful noise as well!

Essential 3: During the day, you’re going to get some sun. I’m not a weatherman, we have our weather page for that, but it may be a lot of sun. Regardless of your complexion and how much sun you expect to have, just do yourself a favor and put on some sunscreen. You don’t want to be sunburned by day two and have to spend the rest of the festival watching your favorite artists from under the shelter of a far off tent. That’s no fun for anyone. 

Sunscreen
Sunscreen blocks harmful rays and keep your skin baby-smooth!

Fun-damental Packing List

Along with the essentials for survival, you may also want to bring some additional goodies to make your festival time a little more enjoyable. The following packing list has those good-time goodies that you should consider.

Goodie #1: Snacks! Granola and nuts are probably going to be your best bets. Nuts if you want to share, granola if you don’t. Why no protein bars? Because they’ll dehydrate you. Why no candy? Because it will melt, get gross and sticky, and generally be a mess.

Goodie #2: Sunglasses and spectral shades. One for the daytime and one for the night (at Shaky Beats at least). Sunglasses (or a hat if that’s your thing) are going to be a real necessity when it comes to keeping those eyes on the stage and not staring into the sun. Your spectral shades basically just act as little prisms, taking those pretty lights to the next level. If you think head, you can get them online for $2 instead of at the event for $20.

Goodie #3: Party Favors. Although you might get them away if you make yourself too obvious, people generally have little to no issue getting stuff in. It’s not my MO, but hey if you want some party favors to help you enjoy the show a little more, then by all means, bring all the party favors you want.

Stay posted for your daily Shaky post leading up to Shaky Beats! See Part two here and Part three here!